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Skywarden,
Ursa Astronomical Association
Kopernikuksentie 1
00130 Helsinki
taivaanvahti(at)ursa.fi

Ursa Astronomical Association

Rocket-related clouds - 26.10.2017 at 19.25 - 26.10.2017 at 19.56 Rotsund, Norja Observation number 67891

Visibility IV / V


Stunning but vicious intense blue "Northern Lights" photographed in northern Norway. Unreal looking.

Blue did not live like green lights. The suspicion thus turned to the Russian missile test on the basis of active Northern Lights and online stuff (spaceweather.com and teknikanmaailma.fi). The nitrogen from the missile's exhaust has hovered west into the atmosphere, creating that blue "fire."

For the first time around the north filming the northern lights, and right away there was such a special sight that you have to get there again. ;)

#raketti: Topol (missile test)



More similar observations
Additional information
  • Havainto
    • Rocket-related clouds
  • Rocket launch
    • Rocket contrails info

      The rocket contrails are colorful clouds that appear when the sun is below the horizon. The contrails can float so high in the atmosphere that the sun shines on them even if it is already completely dark on the ground. They stay visible noticeable quite long after the launch.

      The colors are created by the scattering of sunlight in the small ice crystals. In Finland, rocket phenomena from two different locations have mainly been observed. One of them is the missile launches from the submarines from the White Sea and the Arctic Ocean. They use solid fuel that creates colorful clouds.

      Another source of rocket phenomena is the Plesetsk Cosmodrome Area in Russia. There are a few launches from there every year. These fires usually use liquid fuels, making the clouds less spectacular.

      The visibility of the rocket launch is affected by the time at which the launch is made and where the winds blow. The best of all is around 3-5 o'clock Finnish time, when the cloud has time to spread out a bit and shine in the morning sun coming from the east when it is still dark or dark in Finland.

      During the first decade of the 2000s, rocket phenomena have been observed about twice per year in Finland. Since then, however, it has been quieter.

      Rocket contrails from Oulunsalo, Photo by Jarmo Moilanen.

Technical information

Canon 6D, Samyang 14mm / 2.8

Comments: 9 pcs
Jorma Koski - 31.10.2017 at 08.55 Report this

Tiptop-havainto! Ja loistokuvat!

Marko Pekkola - 31.10.2017 at 09.04 Report this

Mahtava saalis, onnittelut! Todella hienoa, että suomalainenkin sai tämän taltioitua.

Antero Ohranen - 31.10.2017 at 13.07 Report this

Hienot kuvat harvinaisesta tilanteesta, onnittelut!!

Olli Sälevä - 31.10.2017 at 18.36 Report this

Hieno havainto ja kuvat. Yövyitkö noissa kuvien igluissa?

Mikko Peussa - 31.10.2017 at 20.43 Report this

Onnittelut hienosta havainnosta.

Marja Karlsberg - 31.10.2017 at 20.58 Report this

Hei Olli,

kyllä yövyttiin tuossa lasi-iglussa. Kerrassaan mahtavalla paikalla sijaitsevat!

Jari Luomanen - 1.11.2017 at 19.36 Report this

Erittäin hieno havainto! Kuten Marko totesi, hienoa että ilmiö jäi suomalaisenkin kuvaajan haaviin. 

Satu Juvonen - 2.11.2017 at 10.53 Report this

Hienoa! Onnittelut erityislaatuisesta havainnosta!

Leo Wikholm - 2.11.2017 at 21.46 Report this

Sininen revontuli näyttää liittyvän Venäjällä tehtyyn ohjuskokeeseen. Tuona päivänä laukaistiin Topol-ohjus Plesetskistä kohti Kamtšatkan niemimaata (Kura).

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