Contact information

Skywarden,
Ursa Astronomical Association
Kopernikuksentie 1
00130 Helsinki
taivaanvahti(at)ursa.fi

Ursa Astronomical Association

All-sky aurora - 7.10.2015 at 20.13 - 7.10.2015 at 23.15 Laitila Observation number 43749

Visibility V / V


Here is the wordless! Sissos why northern lights! The corona was spun above the head by eukos from ALE skirt fabric on Stokka's crazy days! Good you didn't get along with the camera. I tossed right, left, sideways and up. Around. Here and there. Exactly where I gave the call so there was stuff left in the box. Even in the south there were fires ... At eleven the weather began to "muffle" and the reposet blurled. The stuff was in total ice so home with good cheer — so REALLY happy! A roaring brown eagle as well as magical badgers seem to follow the firing. The fog shone with his absence. The ravens in the vicinity shouted, even took off, and all the animals roared in the choir. Cows, dogs, wolf and tallow. Both Owl, Fox and THE BADGE. Incredible noise. At the beginning of the repos, shortly before the corona, there was a rumble resembling a distant thunderstorm — a fighter air exercise? There was also buzzing and crackling around as the repos intensified. The distance to the power lines is about 400m. Among the corona, I saw either a starburst or a torch like that. When I get out of the hospital (surgery at 11 a.m.) and get my guts on my mind, I try to dig a picture for Vahti to see. Now I was able to shout "BINGO, all shapes right" if those repo looks should be described ... I edited this observation a bit afterwards, I added one picture where there are a lot of those dune patterns on fire in the next few days.

#epraitoja



More similar observations
Additional information
  • Aurora brightness
    • Very bright auroras
  • Colors with unaided eye and other features
    • Streaming auroras info

      Streaming. In streaming aurora fast irregular variations in brightness occur along the horizontal dimension of homogeneous shapes.

    • Flickering auroras info

      Flickering. This rare subclass refers to a situation where irregular variations in brightness occur in aurora, such as in fluttering flames.

    • Flaming auroras info

      Flaming. This rare subclass of aurora does not mean so much a single shape, but a large area in the sky. In the flaming aurora, bright waves that are sweeping upward towards the magnetic zenith emerge in the sky. Very rarely waves can wipe downwards. Bands are usually reported during flaming, less often spots.

    • Pulsating auroras info

      Pulsating aurora. The brightness of the pulsating aurora usually varies rhythmically over a period that can be only a fraction of a second at its fastest, but can also be several minutes. Pulsing usually only occurs in(strong auroral conditions) higher quality shows , especially towards the end of them. However, the pulsation may be followed by yet another eruption. Sometimes the variation in brightness is at the same stage in the whole form, whereby the whole form "turns on and off" at the same time. Pulsation is also found in arches and bands, but above all in spots..

    • Blue auroras info

      Clearly blue auroras can be seen only during the best aurora displays close to the maximum phase or soon after it. Sometimes blue auroras can be seen shortly after the sunset at the top part of the auroral shapes, specially rays. It is created by the mission of the ionized nitrogen molecules created by the suns radiation.

      Strongly colored blue auroras. Photo by Jorma Mäntylä.

      Blue top parts of the aurora. Image by Tom Eklund. 

      Blue top parts of the aurora. Image by Jaakko Hatanpää.

      Partly blue corona. Photo by Tapio Koski.

      Faintly blue top parts of an aurora veil. Photo by Jaakko Hatanpää.

    • Yellow auroras info

      Yellow aurora color that can be seen with naked eye is a rarity that can arise from suitable combinations of green, red, and blue in bright shows.

    • Fully red auroras info

      Completely dark red aurora is a very rare and strikingly handsome revelation. This phenomenon is also due to the discharge of an excitation state of an atomic oxygen.

      Throughout red aurora. Photo by Tobias Billings.

    • Red coloration of the shapes top info

      Auroras which have red top part that can be seen with naked eye are most often observed in the bands and long rays. In this case the lower parts are usually green. If the upper parts are in sunlight, red may be stronger than green. This shade of red is due to the discharge of the excitation state of the atomic oxygen.

      Aurora that shift to reddish towards the top. Photo by Karri Pasanen. 

      Red top in a aurora band. Photo by Simo Aikioniemi.

      Red at the top of the aurora. Picture of Tom Eklund.

    • Green auroras info

      Green, seen with the naked eye, is one the most common colors of the aurora. The green color is derived from atomic oxygen.

      Green auroras. Lea Rahtu-Korpela.

      Green auroras. Photo by Juha Ojanperä.

    • White auroras info

      Paljain silmin valkoinen väri näkyy useimmiten himmeissä näytelmissä, kun silmä ei kykene erottamaan mitään varsinaista väriä. Harvoin kirkkaissa näytelmissä valkoinen väri voi myös syntyä sopivista vihreän, punaisen ja sinisen yhdistelmistä.

    • Violet auroras info

      Usually in Lapland or even in the south you can see purple auroras in stronger aurora shows. The most common color in auroras along with green and red.

  • Observed aurora forms
    • Dunes info

      Dunes

      The dunes are a dim and very rare shape that has so far been associated with the aurora visible in early evening.

      Aurora dunes can be most easily confused to ribbons on lower clouds. In order to fill in the description of the phenomenon, a striped pattern formed by parallel lines must also appear in the aurora. The stripes are most easily recognizable right at the front edge of the aurora but they may also occur among the rest of the aurora.

      The dune auroras are visible as a parallel striped float. Photo by Tapio Terenius

      Raidallisen dyynilautan reunassa voi toisinaan olla voimakastakin aaltoilua.

      There can sometimes be strong ripples at the edge of a striped dune float. The rippling of the edge of the dune float can vary from minor to large (pictured). Photo by Pirjo Koski

    • Form not identifiable info

      Form not identifiable
      Sometimes auroras have to be observed in such poor conditions that it is not possible to reliably identify the shape even if for example the structure and conditions could be recognized. Such a situation could be the outcome of for example alight background sky, cloud cover or a covered horizon.

    • Veil info

      Veil
      Veil is the most bland and very common form of aurora. It usually covers its homogeneous dim glow over a wide area of the sky at once. Most often, the veil is seen in the calmer and quiet phase of the night after the aurora maximum as a background for other forms. The veil can also occur alone and in that case it will be quite difficult to reliably identify as an aurora, especially at a observation site which has a lot of light pollution.

      A similar glow of light can also be caused by airborne moisture, smoke, or a very thin layer of clouds that reflects the light that hits them. However, clouds can also be used to identify veil, especially if the middle or upper cloud appears dark against a lighter background, then it is very likely to be aurora veil if the brightness of the background sky is not due to the rising or falling Moon or Sun. When photographing, very long exposure times usually reveal the green colour of the veil auroras.

      Veil and rays. Photo by Esa Palmi.
       

      Red aurora veil. Photo by Marko Mikkilä.

       

      Veil. Photo by Milla Myllymaa.

       

      Aurora veil that changes color from green at the lower edge through purple to blue at the top. Photo by Jaakko Hatanpää.

       

      Dim green veil. Photo by Jarmo Leskinen.

       

      Radial aurora band surrounded by veil. Photo by Jussi Alanenpää.

    • Rays info

      The raysare parallel to the lines of force of the magnetic field, i.e. quite vertical, usually less than one degree thick light streaks. The rays can occur alone or in connection with other shapes, mainly with arcs and bands. Short rays are usually brightest at the bottom but dim quickly. The longest rays, even extending almost from the horizon to the zenith, are usually uniformly bright and quite calm, and unlike the shorter rays, most often occur in groups of a few rays or alone. Rays, like bands, are a very typical form of aurora.

      Artificial light pillars, which are a halo phenomenon visible in ice mist, can sometimes be very similar to the rays of aurora. Confusion is possible especially when the lamps that cause the artificial light pillars are far away and not visible behind buildings or the forest. The nature of the phenomenon is clear at least from the photographs.

      Rays. Picture of Tom Eklund.

      Rays. Photo by Mika Puurula.

      Two beams rise from the aurora veil. Photo by Anssi Mäntylä.

      Two radial bands. Show Jani Lauanne.

      Radial band and veil. Photo by Jussi Alanenpää.

      Two rays. Photo by Aki Taavitsainen.

      It may be possible to confuse such rays with artificial light columns. Compare the image below. Picture of Tom Eklund.

      There is no aurora in this image, but all the light poles - including the wide and diffuse bar seen at the top left - are artificial light pillars born of ice mist. Photo by Sami Jumppanen.

      Aurora and artificial light pillars. All the radial shapes in the picture above are probably artificial light pillars that coincide appropriately with the aurora band. In the image below, the aurora band has shifted and does not overlap with the pillars produced by the orange bulbs. There is no orange in auroras. Photo by Katariina Roiha

    • Band info

      Bands are usually narrower, more twisty at the bottom, brighter, and more active than arches. Bands usually develop from arches.

      Bands can form J and U shapes, sometimes even full spirals. The corona can also arise from bands. Bands are a fairly common form of aurora.

      Aurora band. Photo by Merja Ruotsalainen.

      Aurora band. Photo by Matias Takala.

      Aurora band. Photo by Lea Rahtu-Korpela.

      Aurora bands. Photo by Lauri Koivuluoma.

      Aurora band. Photo by Matias Takala.

    • Corona info

      CoronaA corona is a hand fan shaped structure, it usually forms south of the observer's zenith, most commonly consisting of rays or bands. The corona is usually the most beautiful part of the aurora show. It is bright and active, but on the other hand also short-lived.

      Aurora corona. Photo by Anna-Liisa Sarajärvi.

      Aurora corona. Photo by Merja Ruotsalainen.

      Corona formed from bands. Photo by Markku Ruonala.

      Aurora corona. Photo by Tapio Koski.

    • Arc info

      ARC The arcs are wider than the bands and do not fold as strongly. The arcs are normally neither very bright nor active.

      The arc is probably the most common form of aurora. When aurora show is a calm arc in the low northern sky it often doesn’t evolve to anything more during night. In more active shows the arc is often the first form to appear and the last to disappear.

      The lower edge of the arc is usually sharp but the upper edge can gradually blend into the background sky. As activity increases rays and folds normally develop, and the arcs turn gradually into bands.

      An aurora arc runs across the picture. Vertical shapes are rays. Photo by Atacan Ergin.

      Aurora Arc. Photo by Mauri Korpi.

      Aurora Arc. Photo by Anna-Liisa Sarajärvi.

      Aurora Arc. Photo by Matti Asumalahti.

Technical information

Canon EOS 7D, Sigma 18-35mm, f1.8, ISO 800-3200, 0.4-5s

Comments: 9 pcs
Heikki Ketola - 8.10.2015 at 08.18 Report this

Upeita otoksia hauskalla kertomuksella höystettynä.

Pirjo Koski - 8.10.2015 at 09.12 Report this

Kiitos! Oli muuten vaikea valita kuvia tällä kertaa...!

Raija Ollikainen - 8.10.2015 at 09.25 Report this

Siinäpä tuli melkoinen läjä taivaallisen ihanaa Pirjon päivän nimpparilahjaa! Onneksi olkoon Oulustakin näin jälkikäteen! :D

Satu Juvonen - 8.10.2015 at 15.44 Report this

Hienot kuvat ja mahtava äänimaisema kertomasi mukaan. Olin myös kuulevinani kohinaa, kuin kaasupoltinta olisi käytetty. 

Aija Kaartinen - 8.10.2015 at 16.09 Report this

Jess! Täysi bingo ehdottomasti, jo näiden kuvien perusteella - sekä extra palkinto eteläisestä sijainnista! Todella upeaa!

Kari Kauppinen - 9.10.2015 at 05.04 Report this

Hienot kuvat, luonnolliset värit.

Matti Helin - 21.11.2016 at 03.23 Report this

Siinäpä on muuten tosi hyvä kuva niistä mysteerilaineista. 

Roope Luukkainen - 21.11.2016 at 14.00 Report this

Hienoja kuvia. 1.8 aukolla saa pidettyä valotusajat lyhyenä ja revontuliin jää reilusti yksityiskohtia.

Pirjo Koski - 21.11.2016 at 16.09 Report this

Kiitos! Sääli vaan, ettei 1.8 istu enää täyskennoon...

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